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Dog collars - An essential guide

This article describes the benefits of various dog collars available on the market and highlights some things to look out for when buying a dog collar. Dog collars are one of the few indulgences for a dog lover. They come in all shapes and sizes and can be both training aids, fashion statements and of course an important identifier of your dog should he or she become lost.

They come in all shapes and sizes and can be both training aids, fashion statements and of course an important identifier of your dog should he or she become lost. Indeed, dog collars are even becoming pet status symbols. Dog collars that spray a harmless substance called citronella up the dogs nose are both benevolent and effective training tools. These types of collars are favoured by dog behavioural experts in preference to the less subtle shock collars. Leather dog collars are generally preferable to nylon ones, they are hard-wearing and ideally suited to a fully-grown dog. Tough dog collars are made with double thick leather sewn together. Dog collars can also be reflective, luminous or have flashing lights and these types are essential if you take your dog for night time walks.

Designer dog collars are pretty easy to find today, and they are perfect to give that special designer look to your favourite pet. Unfortunately, as with a pair of shoes, the need to accessorise can be taken too far and, whilst being fashionable and impressive, the collar could also be an uncomfortable, ineffective or even damaging impediment for the dog so the primary considerations in choosing dog collars should be comfort and utility. Does the dog enjoy wearing the collar and does it meet its basic functions as a collar? The collar should not be too loose or too tight and should be strong enough to hold the dog safely. For a small dog, you should not be able to fit more than one finger between the collar and the dogs neck. Be aware that some dog collars can rub abrasively and cause sores. Observe your dog closely for a day or two after attaching the collar to make sure everything is OK.

To summarise, dog collars are very useful and it is essential that your dog have at least one collar. The primary purpose of dog collars is to benefit the dog rather than gratify the owner but a properly chosen collar will amply do both.

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Monday, 16 December 2019

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